Lynch narrated his original Beast Quake run.

Lynch coined his own nickname, Beast Mode, when he came into the league. Those words came to represent his style of play, best epitomized by his two Beast Quake runs.

In the first one, against the New Orleans Saints in the Wild Card round following the 2011 season, Lynch made contact with seven different Saints defenders, none of whom came close to slowing him down, on his way to the end zone. The Saints had finished the regular season 13-3 and were heavily favored to beat the home team. Seattle went 7-9 in 2011 and made it into the postseason by being just good enough to win the NFC West with a losing record.

The “Quake” part of its name came from the seismic activity at CenturyLink Field immediately after Lynch’s touchdown. It registered as a magnitude-one earthquake, SB Nation’s Matt Ufford learned from John Vidale, the director of the Pacific Northwest Seismic Network.

And that wasn’t the only time Lynch pulled off a Beast Quake. In 2014, he pulled off the longest touchdown run of his career, bouncing off multiple Arizona Cardinals defenders en route to a 79-yard touchdown. The Week 16 win over the Cardinals helped the Seahawks lock up the NFC West.

During a visit to the NFL Films Studio, Lynch narrated his original Beast Quake run. Lynch’s commentary is probably the only thing that could make this play better.

We can’t get enough of Beast Quake, or anything else Marshawn does, and we’re thrilled he’s back.

He struggles to shed blockers — a lapse that will only grow during the transition from the AAC to the NFL. He also has a tendency to bite hard on play-action fakes, luring him toward the line of scrimmage and taking him away from his duties over the top. These are all coachable fixes, but at 23 years old, he’s an older prospect who may not have as high of a ceiling as some of the younger defensive backs in the class of 2017.
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